Ospreyshire Origins: Lifeblood: Monologue

Lyrics:

A World War and racial segregation
Wasn’t going to stop me from saving lives
Soldiers were dying
I knew how to innovate in times like these
And even my enemies at home had to bank on it

Every type was given to me to save lives
I chilled the sources and stored them for emergencies
Next, came the samples as cargo on the go
To hospitals and beyond
15,000 in the UK alone
Better thank my inventions for saving their lives

Too bad my employer threw racist pseudoscience
As to who got transfusions or not
I would be cut off from this world
But my method of saving lives continues


Isn’t it a shame when people who literally save lives never get credit for their heroism? It’s no wonder why I have superhero fatigue since more people know who Iron Man, Superman, and Captain America are than this doctor. Like most of the people Dear Innovare focuses on, I didn’t know who Dr. Charles R. Drew was until long after I graduated from school (high school AND at the university level). Charles R. Drew invented the blood bank which continues to save lives through the process of blood transfusions. He came up with this concept during WWII and saved a ton of soldiers lives. Not only that, but he created the bloodmobile, so blood can be refrigerated and stored on the go to various hospitals or clinics. Unfortunately, there were racist idiots who denied the blood from black people even if it could save lives and Dr. Drew was disillusioned by this bigotry (he’s an African-American man, by the way). He died in a car crash at the age of 45 which is very tragic and not many people know his name. Don’t worry, Dr. Drew. I’ll make sure more people know who you are.

Side note: The title of the song is a reference to the Canadian band Lifestory: Monologue.

The image of Charles R. Drew is from Ferris State University.

Ospreyshire Origins: Onesimus the Unsung Hero

Lyrics:

Bodies kept dropping in Boston
In the century of their so-called Lord in the 18th century
While I wasn’t the same as the saint of the Byzantium,
We were both in bondage
My master begged me to save him and the city
With my memory from the motherland before I was chained
Once I was useful like my enforced foreign namesake, more kept breathing
All I want is credit and freedom, doctors
I don’t know about their originator, but I had stubbornness to accept the faith of those who captured me
Shame on me
Boston would’ve been a ghost town without my medical services


Happy New Year, everybody! This is the first new post of the new decade!

Anyways, let’s get to the subject at hand. This track is about the invention of medical inoculation. It was an invented by a slave named Onesimus who lived in Boston, MA hundreds of years ago. People were dying wholesale as smallpox ravaged this New England city. He managed to save thousands of lives with this medical technique that is still used to this day albeit modernized. It’s frustrating that this man never gets credit for his innovation in literally saving lives. One parallel that some Bible readers might notice would be the character of Philemon of the same name who was also a slave. I didn’t know about Onesimus until just a couple of years ago. He should be more renowned and I had to be the one to do it in spoken word form. https://face2faceafrica.com/article/this-slave-curbed-the-smallpox-epidemic-in-boston-in-1721-with-an-african-technique.

The image of Onesimus is from Face2Face Africa.