Zimbabwe, don’t turn your country into Rhodesia 2.0 even if the colonizer is of a different race

I found out about this story not long after this video was first uploaded and I was seething with rage. Apparently, this Chinese company has been enslaving Zimbabweans and doing all types of cruel things to the Africans in that country. This is just sick. In the thumbnail, you could see them moving sick women with a FORKLIFT and not stretchers. There is a chemical used that’s been knocking out the women workers which is dangerous as well as very suspicious. I seriously hope they aren’t taking sexual advantage of them. Thankfully, the workers have spoken up and collecting receipts of these gross violations. I hope these devils get jail time. You don’t see Africans enslaving Chinese people, much less the Asian community, and this needs to be stopped.

I just had to talk about this issue with how infuriated I was with this news story. Why isn’t this hitting worldwide news channels? Oh, I have a few guesses why. I felt compelled to share this with everyone.

Trademarking “Yoruba”? Shame on you, Timbuktu (the UK company)!

It’s been a while since I talked about news around the world, but I saw this video which ticked me off so much that I just have to talk bout it.

There’s a British company called Timbuktu who had the temerity to trademark the word “Yoruba”. For those who don’t know any thing about that word, it refers to an actual African ethnic group and language associated with Nigeria, Benin, and Togo although Nigeria has a huge Yoruba population. Some famous people of that ethnicity involve actor John Boyega, basketball player Hakeem Olajuwon, and rapper Wale to name a few. The Nigerian community got infuriated by this trademark controversy and rightfully so. They were raising awareness to this issue. Also, am I the only one who noticed that this company is named after the famous Malian city?

This is just blatant cultural appropriation and I hope Timbuktu gets enough pressure to drop the trademark. I never bought anything from them and I hope there’s a giant boycott against them for what they did. What’s up with these companies trademarking African things? You have this recent case, Louis Vuitton making “luxury” Maasai cloths, and (I will not stop repeating this example because this company deserves the smoke) Disney freaking trademarking the phrase “Hakuna Matata”! These corporations need to stop doing this and I hope people stop buying their things. Think about it, they trademarked the name of an ethnic group consisting of millions of people around the world and not just in Western Africa. How would people react if Timbuktu or any company trademarked the name(s) of another ethnic group such as Irish Travelers, Sicilians, or Ashkenazim? I’m sure there would be even more outrage if anyone dared to do so. Nobody should be turning ethnicities into intellectual property.

The fact that people tell me that cultural appropriation isn’t bad or doesn’t exist is just idiotic because they never had to deal with their heritage being slighted in the least.

Self Made…Stop Misrepresenting Annie Malone!


I’m sure some of you have heard about the new Netflix series Self Made about Madame CJ Walker. I haven’t seen this show, but when I heard that they did Annie Malone wrong, I just had to talk about it.

This is the second time when real life affects my “Dear Innovare…” album. First, we have the unfortunate passing of Cameroonian musician Manu Dibango who wrote “Soul Makossa” (AKA The song “Wanna Be Starting Something” ripped off) as mentioned in “Cameroonian Originality March” and now Self Made slanders Annie Malone?

This ticked me off so much since CJ Walker is NOTHING without Annie Malone and I hate how she never got the credit for being the first ADOS female millionaire and also the first one to make a beauty college. It seems like I’ve been proven right about so many different things over the past year or so like how I was exposed to The Lion’s Share documentary or Petite Noir’s La Maison Noir music video. This is why we need to tell our own stories. I was glad that the blogger talking about this Wongel Zelalem thought it was an amazing learning experience and wanted to get the history right. If you’re curious about her accent, it’s because she’s from Ethiopia, by the way. The truth needs to be shared out there.